Category Archives: Culture & Play

Documenting a Legend

Leanne Robinson-Maine

Environmental leadership documentary So Right So Smart is airing on Public Broadcasting Stations (PBS) in the US during 2015. Interface asked the makers of the film to tell us a little bit about the film’s origin.

“How and why did you decide to embark upon this filmmaking venture?”

MagicWig’s Leanne Robinson-Maine responds:

In simple terms, the answer to that question is a question: “How could we be in the video and filmmaking industry and NOT find a way to document and share with the world the inspiring story unfolding before our eyes?”

MagicWig Productions, Inc. has had a longstanding relationship with Interface as a client. Our founders have been producing meetings and videos for Interface, Inc. since 1995, right after Ray Anderson’s “Spear in the Chest” epiphany. We got to see first hand the changes that the company went through under Ray’s leadership: the initial reactions that “Ray had gone around the bend,” the growing pains involved in changing the culture, the steady embedding of sustainability into Interface’s DNA, and the emergence of a restorative mission for the company. And we have it all on tape. So, we were in a perfect position to use all of that archival footage to share Interface’s inspiring story of transformation with the world.

SRSS Filming Ray Anderson on his porch.

The crew (Justin Maine, Leanne Robinson-Maine and Christopher Haines) interviewing Ray Anderson in 2007 at his North Carolina home. Photo credit: Stephen Ross

At MagicWig we have been cheering for Interface from the sidelines all this time.  We watched in awe as Ray steered his “well oiled” carpet tile manufacturing giant, his third child, toward a completely new and revolutionary goal—one with environmental ethics that really resonated with us. In fact, Guy Noerr, one of the co-founders of our company, has always referred to Ray as “his personal Mickey Mantle”—a legend in his time and Guy’s true hero. And it was Guy who originally proposed to the MagicWig partners that we embark on this “passion project”, producing a full length feature documentary about Ray.

Co-founder Justin Maine, who heads up our video department, responded with the thought that although Ray’s story should be the central character arc of the film, we should explore a wider scope. Ray was a pioneer in his industry—a visionary. But even more interesting was how, with his almost evangelical outreach, Ray held up Interface as an experimental model to inspire other organizations. And the story of Interface’s eco-industrial leadership would be even more powerful when shown in the context of the greater environmental sustainability movement.

The MagicWig team agreed and decided Justin should direct the film. Soon afterward, they brought me on as a writer/producer on the project, and pre-production began. After a period of extensive research, we developed a list of the key parties we were interested in interviewing, from environmental advocates like Paul Hawken and David Suzuki to leaders of a host of other businesses at various stages in sustainability journeys. We wanted to put our finger on the pulse of the corporate sustainability movement from as many perspectives as possible. The list grew as we learned more in each interview and had new questions.

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“The Board” was our visual reference for arranging scenes and topics throughout the editing process.

After two years of traveling around the country during the production phase, we had collected more than 60 interviews and over 350 hours of footage. Trying to decide what went into the film (when there was so much incredible content) was a big challenge and a long process of integrating multiple creative viewpoints (which is how we ultimately ended up with four directors!). Along the way we scripted narration to provide a through-line for all of the different topics covered in the film. Serendipity led us to Daryl Hannah, who turned out to be a huge fan of Ray Anderson. The rest is history. From pre- to post-production, the film took about four years to complete.

So Right So Smart had its world premiere at the Wild & Scenic Environmental Film Festival in January 2009 where it won Best in Festival.  It had its international debut at Reel Earth New Zealand where it won Best Feature. The film has played at over 30 festivals across the globe, has had a limited theatrical release in several US cities, and is currently being broadcast on PBS stations across the country throughout 2015.

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The four Directors (Leanne Robinson-Maine, Guy Noerr, Justin Maine and Michael Swantek) with Ray Anderson at the Atlanta Film Festival.

We hear so many wonderful responses to the film. Most of them include the sentiment that Ray Anderson, sharing his story the way only Ray could, was critical to their experience of the film and their receptiveness to its message. We like to think that So Right So Smart is continuing the outreach that Ray saw as his mission: using his amazingly magnetic, charismatic personality to engage people and then showing them a living example of change and hope for a more restorative future. We are honored to be able to take a supporting role in sharing the story that we have been so lucky to witness first hand.

To watch the film in your city, visit the film’s website to find the broadcast date for your local PBS channel.

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On Being Inspired

Chip DeGrace

When your world is communicated through the medium of squares, the idea of a rectangle is radical indeed. In a moment of unbridled geometric experimentation, we created the skinny plank. Its shape is twice the length and one half the width of our beloved 50cm square. When we laid it on the floor, its movement was dynamic. It added color uniquely and distributed texture in ways normally reserved for wood and stone. It was a new vocabulary waiting for a fresh group of storytellers.

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The skinny plank is the newest modular format from Interface, measuring 25cm x 1m, and lends itself to limitless design options.

We wanted to inspire the architects and designers who design with our products to think about the skinny plank in new and abstract ways. We were so excited about the possibilities of planks that we felt it demanded new collaborators to express its potential.

A member of our design team is an alumnus of Savannah College of Art and Design and knows firsthand the high caliber of work being done in the multi-media graduate program. We became the real life client for a class of 14 students with backgrounds in video/film, animation and advertising. Their challenge was the creation of four short films investigating the nature of the skinny plank. Wildly collaborative, the experience inspired us and the students’ work is sure to inspire all who experience it.

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Students from the School of Digital Media at SCAD have fun at the Interface Atlanta showroom after an in-depth research session on the company and products.

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Serving Schools Around the World with Green Apple

Melissa Vernon

Working at Interface, our commitment to close the loop and make our carpet out of 100% recycled materials has made us incredibly aware of the scarcity of natural resources. But there is scarcity of another precious and limited resource that the Green Apple Day of Service illustrated to us – our time. In our hurried, fast-paced, and busy lives, it takes real effort to slow down and focus on what matters.

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At Interface, we often spend our days with our heads down, staring at the floor. But when we see visuals like this, big smiles appear across our faces and we know we are making a difference.

In 2014, our 3rd year of sponsoring the Green Apple Day of Service, we experienced an even greater interest from employees and customers around the world to take action and create better learning environments for students.

Interface is in a distinctive position because we are able to directly impact the USGBC’s Center for Green Schools’ mission of putting all students into a green school within a generation. Working in partnership with our customers from the interior design profession and USGBC Chapter community, we literally created better learning environments for students by removing dirty, worn carpet and replacing it with high performing, low-offgassing, nature-inspired Interface carpet tiles. Students at Uintah Elementary in Salt Lake City, Utah received new carpet in their multipurpose room. The principal reported, “The students have been so funny about wanting to keep it really clean and nice.”

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Installing new carpet at Uintah Elementary in Salt Lake City, Utah

At Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Atlanta, Georgia, school staff remarked, “Your donation serves as an example to our students that they should not only take pride in their school work, but also in the school itself,” thereby illustrating the motto of the Center for Green Schools – #wherewelearnmatters.

Leveraging Interface’s leadership in sustainability, we educated students around the world about sustainability challenges and opportunities. We inspired the Charter High School for Architecture and Design students in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania about the importance of recycling on a local and global level. The students were given the challenge of designing recycling containers that will hopefully be produced and distributed throughout the school.

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Left: Students from Charter High School for Architecture & Design in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Right: “Mission Zero Heroes” from the Boys & Girls Club of West Georgia.

Students repurposed waste from our manufacturing facilities around the world and created stools and savings banks in Thailand and costumes for “Mission Zero Heroes” with the Boys & Girls Club of West Georgia.

In total Interface contributed over 50 projects globally to the 3,700 total Green Apple Day of Service projects. Every division of our company participated, including our FLOR stores and manufacturing facilities in Thailand, Australia, Georgia, and Holland. Our sales teams from Latin America, Europe, and across the United States joined forces with customers to leave a lasting legacy with schools and students.

The schools reminded us of our limited resources. Staff at Cristo Rey High School in Atlanta said, “Interface demonstrated that giving time is just as important as giving material things. As our Principal, Fr. Van Dyke likes to say, ‘there is always an opportunity to make more money. But time is not something we can make more of.’  So when we choose to give time, it is a much greater gift.”

Interface’s mission to be restorative inspires us to leave a positive social impact in a way that is good for our business. The Green Apple Day of Service is also important to Interface because it taps into the power of business and leverages the design solutions that we offer to create better learning environments for students around the world.

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Green Apple is a great sponsorship to strengthen and build new relationships with our customers and partners, particularly in the education market segment. These projects inspire customers, our communities, and our own employees to make a difference by “doing well by doing good,” and as Ray Anderson used to say, to “Brighten the corner where you are.”

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Oh What a Difference We Can Make

Deb France

On Wednesday, Aug. 27, students returned to Reynolds High School in Portland, Oregon after the summer break. Media were gathered at the curb and security officers were poised to guide the parents, students, faculty and community members on a guided tour of the gym. This was only 47 days following a tragic shooting in the locker room where freshman Emilio Hoffman was shot and killed by a fellow student, and a teacher was injured before the shooter took his own life.

“The space has been transformed,” says Superintendent Linda Florence. “Remodeling the building plays a key role in helping students feel safe again.”

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Reynolds High School students excitedly gathered around a new video wall during the opening of the renovated gym lobby.

My firm, Oh planning+design, architecture, was working with the school district on summer projects that included a renovation of the locker rooms where the shooting occurred. I received the call after the June 10 tragedy that the gym lobby was damaged from the shooting and needed to be included in the design. The construction crews were already prepared to start work on the locker rooms, with only 46 days remaining until the new school year began.

There was no doubt that we had to renovate the lobby area, but time was going to be tight!  Design plans needed to be drawn, knowing that accessing available building materials within such a short timeline would be difficult. This had to be a project that represented the entire building community. If we approached all the needed improvements in a unified way, we could do more. The lobby transformation could only be completed if the materials were selected from overstock and readily available products.

We wanted to provide a sense of renewal, safety and hope to the students when they returned, so I made it my mission to personally reach out to the materials suppliers and ask them for whatever they could offer, including donations. The response was immediate and overwhelming. The outpouring of help was very touching and really sent a strong message of unity and support to the school, students and families. Each community member has a role in forming a safe environment for learning.

The project architect, Jackie Gilles, and the team at Oh planning+design, architecture, as well as contractors from Centrix Construction, worked long days and weekends to build the expanded design and install the donated materials. It was incredible to see how the design and construction team pulled together to make this project happen at lightening speed.

One of the first companies to respond was Interface. Interface was a natural fit for this project because of their support of the USGBC’s Center for Green Schools and their shared commitment to provide safe and healthy learning environments through the Green Apple Day of Service. When they received the call to participate, they did not hesitate even for a moment. Interface donated 1000 square feet of the entry walk-off carpet for the two main entrance doors.

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All of the building materials were wholly or partially donated, including the Interface carpet tile for the lobby entry-way.

Thanks to Interface and other manufacturers, no part of the gym lobby was left untouched. All materials were wholly or partially donated to make this a success. Other donations were received from Designtex, Pacific Window Tinting, 3M, JS Creative Arts, Viridian, 9Wood, Hunter Douglas, Beynon Sports, EB Bradley, Lumicor, Lewis Audio Video, Armstrong, Inpro, Miller Paint and Daltile.

The collaboration transformed not only the physical environment, but also the hearts of the students who attend Reynolds High.

Deb France is the founding principal at Oh planning+design, architecture in Portland, Oregon.

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Living Cully – Building a Park & a Lasting Legacy

Joanna Gangi

Creating a healthy, safe and vibrant community starts with dedicated residents who are committed to lasting change. The Cully neighborhood in Northeast Portland is rich with culture and diversity, yet it is one of the most underserved communities in Portland.

In a city where there is a plethora of parks and ample green space, the Cully neighborhood severely lacks access to this basic service. A team lead by Verde has been working to bridge this environmental justice gap and bring a much-needed park to the community with the Let Us Build Cully Park coalition. Once complete, the Thomas Cully Park will include a community garden and a safe place for children and adults to play and enjoy.

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Recently, the International Living Future Institute and founding sponsor Interface launched the first Legacy Project and teamed up with Verde* to transform a run-down public right-of-way into a safe, beautiful and refreshing green space. The Cully Adopt-a-Spot plot sits adjacent to the Thomas Cully Park and helps frame the park’s entrance to be an accessible area for residents to enjoy. The Legacy Project team worked with the Cully neighborhood residents over the course of four months to make this transformation possible. The process included three public workshops with the largely Spanish-speaking community to listen to their concerns, develop ideas together and design lasting solutions. Many of the residents expressed their desire to make this a safe and enjoyable walking path, as it is a highly utilized area and borders a busy roadway. The community modeled their vision for the space, and the passion was contagious to the design team as they included the residents’ ideas to the composition of the space.

The collaborative planning process culminated on May 24, when members of Verde, Interface, The Institute, Cully residents and volunteers rolled up their sleeves and spent the day planting and building the Cully Adopt-a-Spot. Interface was integral in the process by sponsoring the event and will continue to sponsor the project through completion. Dozens of shrubs and trees were planted in the ground. A walkway was constructed through the middle of the space to provide a safe and accessible avenue to local businesses. And a wall was built to border the busy roadway. All of the materials used were compliant with the Living Building Challenge materials Red List, which helped inspire the design team to seek certification, making it the second park ever to attempt the Living Building Challenge.

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Neighborhood families and children of all ages participated in the work party and were very excited to see the space transforming before their eyes. Children were enthusiastic to take part as they dug, filled wheelbarrows and watered the new shrubs. One child said, “This is like a work party, work isn’t fun but this is fun!” Another child stated, “I never came here before; it was gross and there were people here that we didn’t want to be around. It was scary and now it is so pretty!” Numerous people honked their horns in support as they drove by— showing that this not only effects the Cully residents but also effects people who would have never thought to look at this site before. It seemed that everyone involved, from young to old, knew the importance of investing in a community that lacks certain services like access to nature. As the walkway began to take shape, the newly formed pocket park portrayed a positive sense of community in the Cully neighborhood. The residents were all committed to making their home beautiful. And working together really proved that transformation is possible with a community-led effort.

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What was once an overgrown lot filled with weeds is now a beautiful, well-lit pathway, complete with a curving steel graphic wall and colorful landscape design filled with plants. The Cully community is a shining example of dedicated residents who care for their neighborhood and are committed to growing a healthy and vibrant community. The engagement of all involved parties is a testament to the potential for seemingly small community initiatives to serve as a catalyst for positive change.

*Verde is a Portland-based non-profit that serves communities by building environmental wealth through Social Enterprise, Outreach and Advocacy.

Author Joanna Gangi is empowered by the fantastic beauty of nature residing in Seattle where she works at the International Living Future Institute as the Editorial Director of Trim Tab.

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