Category Archives: Design Inspirations

Marsala

Gretchen Wagner

We are all well on our way to an extra fabulous 2015. All those pesky, unfinished projects from 2014 are finally wrapping up, leaving bright space in the new year. And what better way to bring about some change than our annual Pantone Color of the Year feature?

2015′s color of the year is Marsala. Marsala isn’t quite red, and it isn’t burgundy or maroon either. It’s best described as a dusty shade of wine. But we can forego the color analysis and get right down to how you can incorporate it into your new year—other than as the perfect color scheme for your best friend’s wedding.

Marsala situates itself neatly between light and dark on the color wheel with just the right amount of saturation to pair beautifully with smoky, warm neutrals or livened with rich blue-violets and a vivid orchid accent. I look at Marsala the same way I do the perfect navy. When used correctly, it falls into that category of neutral sophistication that just about everyone is trying to achieve. But when paired with some vibrancy, Marsala can pack quite the punch of energy to get you riled up for 2015.

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For the mindful self-care approach, wrap yourself in that cashmere blanket you’ve had on your wishlist since 2012 and pair with lush Marsala velvet throw pillows. Think about Marsala more as an accent to your otherwise neutral wardrobe and find subtle ways to incorporate it into your ensemble. Maybe it’s a new nail color at the salon or a fresh pair of pumps. For the color enthusiast, Marsala is your starting point. Begin with a staple item in the color (i.e. a gorgeous chiffon dress or wide leg pant) and layer with saturated accents.

Whether you’re more subdued or over-hued, Marsala can work for you if you work with it.

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On Being Inspired

Chip DeGrace

When your world is communicated through the medium of squares, the idea of a rectangle is radical indeed. In a moment of unbridled geometric experimentation, we created the skinny plank. Its shape is twice the length and one half the width of our beloved 50cm square. When we laid it on the floor, its movement was dynamic. It added color uniquely and distributed texture in ways normally reserved for wood and stone. It was a new vocabulary waiting for a fresh group of storytellers.

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The skinny plank is the newest modular format from Interface, measuring 25cm x 1m, and lends itself to limitless design options.

We wanted to inspire the architects and designers who design with our products to think about the skinny plank in new and abstract ways. We were so excited about the possibilities of planks that we felt it demanded new collaborators to express its potential.

A member of our design team is an alumnus of Savannah College of Art and Design and knows firsthand the high caliber of work being done in the multi-media graduate program. We became the real life client for a class of 14 students with backgrounds in video/film, animation and advertising. Their challenge was the creation of four short films investigating the nature of the skinny plank. Wildly collaborative, the experience inspired us and the students’ work is sure to inspire all who experience it.

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Students from the School of Digital Media at SCAD have fun at the Interface Atlanta showroom after an in-depth research session on the company and products.

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Feeling Taupe

Gretchen Wagner

Taupe is the middle ground between warm and cool. The perfect taupe lies in the balance of fullness and minimalism. A good taupe is hard to find, but rest assured, we’ve found it for you.

Feeling inspired by concrete textures, neutral ceramics and soft natural textures? Us too.

More comprehensive building blocks are being added on a regular basis to meet all your taupe needs. Searching for the right compliment to your polished concrete floors? Or maybe you’re looking for that understated sophistication that taupe knows all too well. Take a look at Reclaim and the POSH Collection for that perfect palette. And don’t worry, if taupe isn’t your thing you’ll surely find the neutral you’re looking for in our newest skinny plank collection, Common Theme Planks.

 

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Mind the Gap

Julie Hiromoto

Continuing our series on the intersection of beauty and sustainability, Julie Hiromoto of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill reflects on her retreat with Interface and fellow architects when these thought leaders discussed how to close the gap between sustainable design and beautiful design. This is the second blog in the series.

In March, Interface, working with Nadav Malin of BuildingGreen, invited a group of architects from small and large practices across the U.S. to warm and sunny San Diego. Our task was to explore the question of why green buildings are not usually considered beautiful, and conversely, why the sexiest buildings are often not very sustainable. What is good green design and why isn’t there more of it? Unlike a typical conference center, our meeting room was enclosed on two sides with floor to ceiling windows facing the water, with a covered boardwalk as breakout space. While we talked, the sky changed colors, and the sun beckoned us outside after a long and relentless winter. Our hotel was located on a private, man-made island, landscaped to resemble a lush Southeast Asian paradise. Despite the irony of it all, or perhaps because of it, the discussions were lively, and we powered through the two and a half days. What an appropriate location to tease out our collective thoughts on this complex topic, as we earnestly worked together to close the gap.

As designers, we craft a vision for the environments in which we live, work, and play. Good design is mindful of the sensory experience in and around these spaces, whether visual, aural, or tactile; old or new; high tech or natural. The decisions we make range from broad sweeping concepts to minute details. We specify products that are included in systems that, in turn, complement other systems. They serve a particular use and group of people in a particular environment. Our intentions are constrained by time, cost, codes and other feasibility questions. On each project, these choices are based on our own values, those of the client, and the communities the project will serve. Our success depends on aligning the project goals with these values.

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Green must be a part of good design. As architects, we have a responsibility for the health and well-being of building occupants, the community and the environment. Greater energy and water efficiency requirements are making their way into building codes and design criteria. Owners are gaining awareness of financial incentives and savings. Health concerns are gaining traction as architects advocate for product transparency through grass roots initiatives like the Health Product Declaration or more established advocacy and education through the AIA’s Design & Health Leadership Group. But along the way, in our scientific pursuit to validate high performance design strategies, did we lose sight of beauty? Are we mired in the myriad charts, graphs, facts and figures used to justify and validate our ideas? Will we have better results realizing our sustainable strategies if instead we promote beautifully integrated solutions with narrative?

How do you define beauty? Countless philosophical and scientific treaties have been written on this topic, but design sensibility is difficult to validate. Beauty, pleasure, and inspiration are subjective; to one person a space may be ideal, to others it may fall short, but aesthetics cannot be cast aside as a frivolous amenity. This is the soul and life-blood of our work. The delight and experience of a space causes us to linger or smile. A unique sense of place makes a building special and memorable. These feelings motivate us to maintain and restore our homes, workplaces, community centers, schools and cultural spaces. The longevity of our architecture is the real lasting sustainable impact of the watts/square foot and liters/day savings. Even if technical advances help us achieve better performance metrics, demonstrated improvements in the buildings we construct and cherish today will build a foundation for further advancement in the next projects. Rome wasn’t built in a day, but it’s still there!

Editor’s note: This blog was originally written before the Living Future unConference in May when the definition of design values continued with an interactive discussion between Julie, Joann Gonchar (Architectural Record), Nadav Malin (BuildingGreen), and Susan S. Szenasy (Metropolis) on the topic of Connecting the Dots: Beauty, Sustainability, and the Occupant Experience. It was held for publishing to be included with our blog series on the intersection of beauty and sustainability.

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Trend Spotting with Gretchen Wagner

Gretchen Wagner

This year has been filled with unexpected jet setting adventures to review design shows and I’m finally hitting my stride in knowing what to look for while on the prowl. The fundamental part of trend spotting is understanding why certain materials and concepts are being explored by more than one company at the same time. Isolated design may be unique and thrilling but it lacks context, and context is all the rage. These similarities give light to overarching themes in product design that reflect the needs and attitudes of the consumer. I like to walk into showrooms expecting the unexpected, and when I find it, I know in an instant that this is what is most special. Here are some of the trends that I found to be most special at ICFF and NeoCon this year.

Poppy, Mandarin, Sundried Tomato. Whatever you want to call it, it’s on the border of red and orange and this color has been all over the fashion industry this year. Everyone is catching onto this gorgeous hue that seems to compliment everything from matte finished woods to lustrous copper and back again. I’ve included a few of my favorite examples of this fluorescent color in action from this season.

Flat materials being converted into three dimensional form through different types of manipulations, including cutting, pleating and folding. Beautiful flat cutouts have been popular with new advances in precise laser cutting and etching, but the evolution to three dimensional objects is deriving from 3-D printers. Creative solutions for making three dimensional forms from two dimensional raw materials are exploding into a world of their own through decorative yet functional objects.

Many companies are being inspired by the Americana and Folk resurgence amongst local artisans and makers. Uniquely niche products are becoming main players as companies such as Maharam and Anthropologie bring these hand crafted goods to market while still retaining a boutique-like experience. Artists are also working alongside larger brands to create collaborative product launches, such as Bernhardt’s recent project where they applied beautifully hand rendered patterns to their jacquard technology.

Texture is everything, and throughout showrooms there was a return to sensory based elements. Including our own Interface experiential space, companies incorporated different textures that invited guests and customers to feel their way through the environment. Stemming from our constant experience within our virtual world, we were asked to awaken the mind through the sensory experience of touch. A beautiful reminder to look up from our screens and live in the reality that is all around us.

Both ICFF and NeoCon were excellent design shows to attend for spotting the new and upcoming trends in May and June. See you next year!

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