Category Archives: Greenbuild 2014

Moments and Memories from Greenbuild 2014

Mikhail Davis

Led by the indomitable George Bandy, Vice President at Interface, and Chairman of the USGBC Board of Directors, our team had a great week of learning, sharing and collaborating at Greenbuild in New Orleans.

Melissa Vernon, Director of Sustainable Strategy (Americas)
This year we saw much broader recognition that green building is about humans too. From the introduction of three social equity pilot credits in LEED, to the sold-out WELL Building Summit, and case studies of biophilic design research at Google offices globally on the health and wellbeing of building occupants, the community and supply chain had a growing presence at Greenbuild.

One of my favorite sessions was led by Deepak Chopra. He provided insights about mindfulness, and I found his talk ties to our exploration of biophilic design and the biochemical response in our bodies when exposed to nature. It was enlightening to hear more on the mind-body connection and our ability to impact our gene expression with our thoughts. He ended with a 12-minute guided meditation – what a reprieve from the craziness of Greenbuild and a nice way to recharge.

Jennifer Kreyssig, Account Executive (Toronto, Canada)
Lindsay James’s opening remarks at the Women in Green breakfast were a highlight. She said: “My father raised me to ‘think like a man, because it’s a man’s world,’ but I’m telling my daughters to think like Nature, because it’s her world.” This kind of shift is the only way to affect positive change.

Strangely, another highlight was spending two full days in our booth space, which was dynamic, thoughtful, beautiful and biophilic, a true respite from the inevitable boredom and physical fatigue that one associates with tradeshows.

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A biophilically inspired booth, perfect for encouraging show attendees to #MakeBeautyHappen in their next projects.

Lauren White, Interactive Marketing Manager (Americas)
There was a young woman – Jennifer – who came to the booth immediately following the Women in Green breakfast. She was so inspired from hearing about Interface and the Net-Works program that she just had to meet us. It was exciting to see the enthusiasm of others generated by our initiatives.

Plus, as a relative newbie to Interface it was really cool to meet members of Interface’s Eco Dream Team during sessions in our booth – Paul Hawken, Bill Browning, Janine Benyus and John Picard. Bill reminded us, “If we’re creating spaces that are beautiful, then we’ll take care of them and love them.”

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Interface’s Eco Dream Team members Bill Browning, Janine Benyus, Paul Hawken and John Picard reflected on 20 years of “beautiful thinking” during two Greenbuild sessions.

Nadine Gudz, Director of Sustainable Strategy (Canada and Latin America)
Two of my favorite moments include:
1) Paul Hawken’s keynote where he questioned whether climate change is happening ‘FOR’ us (not ‘TO’ us) sparked critical discussion among many Greenbuild delegates about strategies and opportunities to accelerate game changing innovation to manage carbon.

2) During the closing plenary, Roger Platt, President of USGBC, shared his highlights from Greenbuild and started with Lindsay James’s remarks and the Net-Works video at the Women’s Breakfast!

Erin Meezan, Global VP of Sustainability
One of the big themes I heard was about reframing. How do we reframe our current environmental challenges to have a more hopeful vision for our future? For example, around climate change, like Paul Hawken’s Project Drawdown. Or around the future of the built environment and design like Janine Benyus’s vision of cities and buildings that can functionally replicate the local ecosystem’s services. At Interface, we have experienced the power of an amazingly big vision, one that has stood the test of 20 years, and continues to inspire us and challenge us. Twenty years ago, we essentially reframed the vision of our company toward a much more hopeful and positive one that many of our employees instantly felt connected to. We think this is possible for the entire movement.

Lindsay James, VP of Restorative Enterprise (Americas)
I heard that Interface’s evening event with Paul Hawken and Janine Benyus was a highlight for many attendees. Some of my favorite thoughts from their inspirational discussion about the relationship between beauty and sustainability include:
• Beauty is enduring, but beauty is constantly evolving. Beauty exists in our perception, which is why information matters, because new information can shift how we perceive beauty. Are conflict diamonds beautiful?
• Beauty is a sacred pact between our senses and our ability to know what is healthy, developed over tens of thousands of years. In nature, beautiful flowers signal future availability of seeds and fruit, and sparkling water, which we find beautiful, signals cleaner water. In today’s world, we have broken this connection, and it is up to all of us, but especially designers, to re-couple the signal of beauty and healthy choices.

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Janine Benyus and Paul Hawken engage with a large crowd during an after hours event on beauty and sustainability. Nadav Malin moderated.

Mikhail Davis, Director of Restorative Enterprise (Americas)
One of the most inspiring things about Greenbuild is being part of a community of champions. In our daily lives, we may be a voice in the wilderness, trying to bring sustainability into our work, whether in design, construction, manufacturing, journalism, public policy, or technology, but at Greenbuild, we are reunited with our community. I was struck by this when presenting on Net-Works for the Sustainability and Design Leaders gathering at the offices of Eskew+Dumez+Ripple Architects. Typically when I present to architecture firms, there are a few green design champions in a larger audience, but this was an entire audience of these champions, a diaspora from dozens of firms, large and small, jam-packed into one small conference room to celebrate and share our common mission.

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Audience of Sustainability and Design Leaders

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Who Needs Beauty?

There’s a tantalizing mystery in our intuitive response to beauty and the sensual experience and associated pleasure from what we hear, touch, taste, smell or see. Science now tells us that we don’t simply desire this kind of beauty; we need it. In an era when we spend most of our time indoors, it is more important than ever that we fulfill this basic human need to #MakeBeautyHappen in our built environment.

Human intuition, neuroscience and building research are converging to tell us that beautifully designed spaces can bring out the best in people. So how does beauty become a functional design element and not just an aesthetic factor? 

Biophilic design helps us marry beauty to function in our built environments (well-placed windows that not only provide a view to the outside, but also allow in more natural light and lessen energy costs) in the same way that nature uses beauty (vibrantly colored blossoms that attract bees for cross pollination).

Some of our most enduring, beautiful and iconic buildings and spaces, including many Frank Lloyd Wright designs and Grand Central Station, meet the definition of biophilic design. We always knew these designs made us feel good, but now we know why. Research shows that people are more productive, learn better, heal faster, and have lower stress levels in spaces embodying the principles of biophilic design.

Considering the positive, measurable impact of biophilic design on a building’s inhabitants, can a building be “green” without beauty?

We believe the answer is “no.” A high performance, green building should do more than lower environmental impacts. It must also renew and inspire the people who use them.

Beautiful, biophilic design offers a means of reliably producing these benefits, potentially making beauty one of the most important drivers of ROI for a building owner. The increased productivity of building occupants, whose salaries surpass the cost of any building over time, more than justifies making beauty a design priority.

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Companies like Google recognize the benefits of biophilic design on its employees and are implementing these strategies to improve the quality of their work environment.

Can beauty also save the world?

Author Lisa Samuels claims that “Beauty wedges into the artistic space a structure for continuously imagining what we do not know.” In other words, beauty can be a catalyst for creation. We believe that beautiful, biophilic spaces can help bring out the kind of compassionate, creative thinking needed to solve the world’s biggest problems. We call this kind of creativity “beautiful thinking,” and we believe it holds the key to unlocking the next wave of social and environmental innovation. We’ve already seen the results of beautiful thinking in restorative system projects like Waterbank Schools and Net-Works. And we hope these are just the beginning.

 

The latest research and guidance on the methodology of biophilic design are the subject of the new Terrapin Bright Green report The 14 Patterns of Biophilic Design.

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