Q&A with Kari Pei, Global Product Designer for Interface

Kari_Pei_2_blogWe recently welcomed Kari Pei, recognized design leader in the textile industry, as Interface’s new global product designer. She will work closely with our internal product design and development teams as well as sustainability leader David Oakey Designs.

Kari is equally at home in the design studio and on the factory floor. Her extensive resume includes work with globally celebrated fashion houses, manufacturers and hospitality brands such as Starwood Hotels, MGM Resorts International, Knoll, Wolf Gordon, Maharam and Jhane Barnes.

Her passion for sustainability coupled with her design expertise and insight made her the perfect choice for this new role. Even though she’s just settled in, she graciously answered some questions so that you can get to know her better. We can’t wait to see her work come to life on the floor!

1. Where are you finding your inspiration right now?

Currently, Interface’s focus on social sustainability is the genesis of my inspiration. The Net-Works program really brought gravity to our idea of social sustainability.

But, in thinking about social sustainability, ideas about commonality among people begin to come to mind. I am struck by the simplicity and universality in textiles from around the world and from a large span of ages. The mark making and patterning from 10th century Korea to 19th century Central America have a common language. Therefore, people come together and seem much more similar than different. In a way, that is a kind of social sustainability we create by using a common dialogue through craft. Incorporating the suggestion of “craft” into design gives a reference to that common language, which I find very inspiring.

2. How does flooring set the tone for the design of a space?

Flooring establishes the hierarchy of the space. It can suggest area designation and delineation. It can soften, harden, calm or activate a space by the change in color, scale, texture and pattern. Flooring informs the use of a space; i.e., for task seating, wayfinding or socializing.

3. What three favorite trends are you seeing right now?

Painterly effects, varied, textured effects and biophilic-inspired patterns.

4. What is your favorite place?

In my life, it is in the hammock of our family house in Katonah, NY, gently swinging while listening to the cacophony of sound made by the wind rustling through the leaves. In the world, it is anywhere I learn about culture.

5. What is your “must have” design tool?

Pencil and paper or Photoshop.

6. What trends are you seeing in the hospitality industry?

The trend I see in hospitality is “uniqueness.” Every hotel wants each of their projects to be considered “unique” in its place in the world. They each have to offer something that is individualistic to that particular hotel so it is memorable and people return to it in order to experience it again.

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